10.8.12

Plant Dyed Yarn




After an overnight of soaking and then a good hard boil this morning on the stove, the dye was ready for my yarn.  I used alum as a pre mordant and then let the yarn simmer for about an hour.  This is what came of todays work:  
Yellow: Tansy flowers  
Green: Tansy leaves and stems (I added a rusty railroad spike at the end to make it really green!) Brown: Acorn tops

Subtle, harmonious color, just as in nature.  






17 comments:

  1. So gorgeous, love the colour!!

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  2. The colours are beautiful, it's lovely to see what can be achieved without the use of chemicals.

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    1. It really is so satisfying to know that nothing toxic is going down the drain.

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  3. beautiful! I need to do that with the thousands of acorns I've got!

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  4. My attempts at natural dyeing have been so disappointing. I suspect it's because I really need to just give in a find some alum. It just amazes me that I can't find any locally.

    Your colors are absolutely stunning!

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    1. I'm surprised too, that you can't find it locally. Do you have a walmart near by? They almost always have it in the spice or canning section. Otherwise, I would ask the manager at your local grocery store to stock it for you. Ours is always more than happy to special order products when I need them. (We have a hard time finding washing soda for hand made soap!) Good luck:)

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  5. Perfectly gorgeous, soft colors! What are you planning to make with it?

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    1. Thanks, Holly! I've got about 220 yards total to work with, so I think I may make a hat or a pair of mittens. Maybe something with a fair isle~ish color pattern!

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  6. Love this! I'm currently working on a plant dyes project for school. I have small dye garden planted. I've been gathering hollyhocks, dyers coreopsis, and marigold flowers. I can't wait to see what the results are.

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    1. How exciting! I'll be keeping an eye out on FB for your results and may pick your brain about the dye garden. It's on our list for the new homestead!

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  7. Just beautiful! I finished the goldenrod and am looking forward to trying to make some green this week - do you think the stems/leaves from the goldenrod would work?

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  8. When I used the stems, they turned yellow too. After I added the rusty railroad spike then it turned green. Maybe you could try some rusty nails? I picked some goldenrod today when we were up north, so it'll be fun to compare our results:)

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  9. Goodness...I had never come across acorn top dyed wool. That one is truly stunning. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks, Natalie. I figured if I could use plants, I could try anything natural! My mind is swimming with possibilities.:)

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  10. It's beautiful! gosh it really is.
    Have you ever used ash leaves for green? I am considering this next.

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  11. Thanks, Melanie. I haven't tried ash leaves yet, but I'm bound and determined to try everything I can get my hands on! I'm adding it to the list.:)

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  12. Hi there! Natural dyeing is fascinating me, and I'm so glad I ran across your lovely blog. The colors you achieved in the dye baths are beautiful, especially the green.. As soon as our pokeberries ripen I plan to try my hand dyeing yarn with the juice from them.
    Have a great weekend!

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